• 8th Grade Language Arts:
    Novels: The Outsiders, A Christmas Carol, Petey, And Then There Were None, To Kill a Mockingbird
    September/October/November
    Who Are You? Project
    Create a Character Project
    The Outsiders
    Reading Response Journals
    Outsiders Paper
    Grammar/Vocabulary
    Poetry
    December/January:
    A Christmas Carol
    Reading Responses
    Final Paper
    Victorian Project
    .Who Are You?
    Poetry
    February/March:
    Petey
    Reading Response Journals
    Writing
    Who Are You?
    Vocabulary/Grammar
    Poetry
    Short Stories
    April/May/June:
    And Then There Were None
    To Kill a Mockingbird
    Who Are You? Final Part
    Writing
    Journals
    Grammar/Vocabulary
    Poetry
    Final Exam
     
    8th Social Studies:
    September/October:
    Economics
    Intro into Native Americans
    October/November/December
    Native Americans
    January:
    Women's History
    February/March/April
    Slavery
    April/May/June
    Civil War
    Final Exam
     
     7th LA:
    September
    Class novel: The Giver by Lois Lowry
     
     Writing:
    - 6 Word Memoir 
    - Reading logs
    - Realistic Fiction Narrative (Writer's Workshop) 
     
    Grammar Topics:
    - Clauses
    - Direct Objects
    - Common Grammar Mistakes
    - Active and Passive Voice 
     
    Additional Literature To Cover:
    - "The Unknown Citizen" by W.H. Auden
    - "I'm Nobody! Who Are You?" by Emily Dickinson 
    - Excerpted chapters from Live Writing by Ralph Fletcher 
      
    7th Social Studies:

    September     

    Hello, and welcome to 7th Grade Social Studies!  Throughout the entire school year, we will be taking an in-depth look at all of the most important historical people, places, and events which helped to found and ultimately shape the United States into the country that it is today.  Before getting into any of that, however, it is crucial that we take a moment to review the major factors that were influencing the global societies both in the Pre-Columbian Americas, as well as Western society in Europe, Asia, and Africa.  Our first lessons of the year will focus primarily on the Americas with a primary focus on the controversial theories of how the first humans arrived in America, how they adapted their lives in order to survive in the various environments that exist there, and the major themes of their cultures and influences.  Next, we will shift to a major review of the history of the Western world, which will culminate in an examination of why the Europeans sought to travel and explore outside of the known world.  This will then springboard our discussions straight into the second unit of the year: European Exploration.  In order to expose the students to all of the actions, both positive and negative, that some of the most famous explorers did during the Age of Exploration, everyone will be assigned a specific explorer to research.  After finding all of the necessary information, each student will then design a trading card for their explorer, which will then be shared with their peers and used as both tools for studying, as well as an integral piece of the review game for the unit.